Glory girls play for great cause

The Perth Glory Women will help to raise awareness about Breast Cancer when they tackle the Newcastle Jets in the final round of matches in the Westfield W-League this Sunday at Members Equity Stadium.

The Perth Glory Women will help to raise awareness about Breast Cancer when they tackle the Newcastle Jets in the final round of matches in the Westfield W-League this Sunday at Members Equity Stadium.

It is a cause close to the hearts of the Glory players, with midfield dynamo Dani Calautti recently seeing her mother Teresa pass away after a protracted battle with the illness last month.

The Glory, in conjunction with Football West and the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) has teamed up to raise awareness and money in the fight to combat the most common cancer among women in Australia.

Glory players and volunteers will be selling pink ribbons, wristbands and shoelaces before the match and both teams have agreed to wear pink armbands during the big clash. All money raised during the day will go directly to the NBCF.

“It-s great that the team and all the supporters will be supporting the foundation (NBCF) for our last match, and hopefully we can help to raise a lot of money and awareness for Breast Cancer,” said Glory player Dani Calautti.

“Breast Cancer has affected my family personally, as it has many other families, and the NBCF needs all the support it can get. I hope all the football family can come out on the 28th (December) to not only watch the Glory girls have a win over the Jets but also support the foundation” she said.

About the National Breast Cancer Foundation

The NBCF is the leading community-funded national organisation in Australia raising money for research into the prevention, detection and treatment of breast cancer.

Since the NBCF was established in 1994, over $48 million has been awarded to Australian-based researchers across every state and territory to improve the health and wellbeing of those affected by breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Fast Facts

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Australia, with more than 13,500 new cases expected this year - new diagnoses are also expected in 95 men.

One in 8 women will be diagnosed with the disease by the age of 85.

More than 2,640 women will die from the disease in a single year- making it the leading cause of cancer-related death in females.

Despite the substantial loss of life, prospects for survival are better than ever. In the last decade, deaths from breast cancer have decreased by approximately 22%.

Early detection is the best method for reducing deaths from breast cancer.

Survivors often encounter problems ranging from physical limitations to psychosocial difficulties following diagnosis and treatment. These issues are now emerging as new targets for researchers.

Getting older is the most common risk factor: about 13% of new cases are among women aged 20-44, 61% in women aged 45-69 and 26% among women over 70. Women of all ages need to understand the importance of finding and treating breast cancer early.

MATCH DETAILS Sunday 28 December Perth Glory v Newcastle Jets Members Equity Stadium Local kick off 4.00pm (6.00pm AEDT)

Tickets: $5, U16-s Free

Merchandise available at the game: Pink Ribbons: $2 Wristbands: $3 Shoelaces: $2